An approach to evaluate wheel-rail match properties considering the flexibility of ballastless track: Comparison of rigid and flexible track models in wheel-rail profile matching

  • Bolun An School of Civil Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Key Laboratory of Track Engineering, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Engineering Research Centre of Rail Traffic Line Safety and Disaster Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China
  • Liang Gao School of Civil Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Key Laboratory of Track Engineering, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Engineering Research Centre of Rail Traffic Line Safety and Disaster Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China
  • Tao Xin School of Civil Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Key Laboratory of Track Engineering, Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China Beijing Engineering Research Centre of Rail Traffic Line Safety and Disaster Shangyuancun 3, Beijing 100044, China
  • Jing Lin Division of Operation and Maintenance Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, 97897, Sweden
Keywords: High-speed railway, Wheel-rail profile matching, Flexible track, Vehicle-track coupling interaction

Abstract

Many different wheel/rail profiles are used in the China high-speed railway, and vehicle operation safety and comfort will decrease if the inappropriate wheel-rail profile pair is used. To solve the problem of estimating the wheel-rail match, many numerical models, including vehicle system dynamic models and wheel-rail rolling contact models, have been established to analyse the wheel-rail dynamic responses. Both methods have less consideration of the
flexibility and vibration characteristics of ballastless track, leading to deviations in the calculation of middle and high frequency vibration. This paper proposes a vehicle-flexible track coupling model and compares it with the vehicle dynamic model (vehicle-rigid track model). In the rigid track model, only the track irregularities are considered in the track module; the vibrations and deformations of rails, track slab and the foundation are considered in the flexible track model. Taking Chinese CRH3 series wheel profile S1002CN and rail profile CHN60 as examples and considering different track excitations, the two models are compared. The wheel-rail interaction forces, wheel-rail wear depths, wear volumes and vehicle accelerations are chosen as analysis indices for the comparative study.

The results show that the wheel-rail forces of the flexible track model are larger than the rigid track model in the frequency range from 70 to 120Hz, while they decrease obviously in the frequency range above 150Hz. The differences in wear depths and volumes between the two models exceed 10%. Therefore, the flexible track model should be considered when studying the match properties of different wheel-rail pairs.

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Published
2019-08-27
Section
Articles